How to Install MySQL 5.6 on Ubuntu 13 x64 / Debian Linux

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Tutorial for : Installing MySQL 5.6 on Ubuntu 13 x64 Debian Linux

This post should help you to understand how to Install MySQL 5.6 on Ubuntu 13.10 x64 / Debian Linux. As I always say, its very simple process to install it. First head over to MySQL Downloads page and get the 64 bit Debian package for MySQL. Current version out there for general available release is [Note this may change as and when they release minors, so pick what ever is latest from this site at the time of your  installation and modify the commands according to your filename]: mysql-5.6.15-debian6.0-x86_64.deb. Make sure you select Debian Linux from the select platform drop down. Make a note of the md5sum to verify that its legit file after we download it. In our case its 409a79231afb46473f8280a108c9dfdd which is right below download button as shown in the picture below.

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Running multiple PostgreSQL 9.2 Instances on CentOS 6/RHEL 6/Fedora

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This post describes how to run multiple PostgreSQL 9.2 Instances on one server in CentOS 6/RHEL 6/Fedora flavors. I am assuming that you have a running postgresql engine on the server already. If not check this post on how to install postgresql server that I wrote earlier and install the first/main instance. Now that you have a running database engine(I will call it first instance) you can start slicing second instance on the same server. As most of my posts I will divide this post into multiple steps for easier understanding and implementation.

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Running Multiple MySQL 5.6 Instances on one server in CentOS 6/RHEL 6/Fedora

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There are numerous advantages to run multiple database instances on the save physical server. Here are some reasons that I would like to point out :

1. Utilize existing hardware properly

2. Long lead times to provide physical hardware

3. Reduce Licensing Hardware / OS costs

4. Smaller/manageable data center foot print

5. Reduced overhead

To run multiple instances using MySQL we need to have a couple of things separate from the initial install on MySQL like data directory, init script and config file. It is quite that simple and here is how we do it, I will subscript 2 for all the files/directories that I am going to create to indicate this new second instance:

1. Create a new data directory [/var/lib/mysql2] and make mysql user own it.

mkdir /var/lib/mysql2
chown mysql.mysql /var/lib/mysql2/

msql_5_6_multiple_1

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Setup pgbouncer connection pooling for PostgreSQL on CentOS/RedHat/Fedora

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This post helps you install, setup and benchmark pgbouncer connection pooling for PostgreSQL 9.2 on CentOS 6/RedHat/Fedora based systems. pgbouncer is one of the PostgreSQL connection poolers. There are other connection poolers available for PostgreSQL. Any enduser applications can be connected to pgbouncer as if it were a PostgreSQL server, and pgbouncer will create a connection to the actual server, or it will reuse one of its existing connections. The purpose of connection poolers in general is to lower the performance impact of opening new connections to PostgreSQL(or Other) databases. pgbouncer can connection pool in three ways, which are

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Setup replication with Postgres 9.2 on CentOS 6/Redhat EL6/Fedora

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This post explains how to setup replication with Postgres 9.2 on CentOS 6/Redhat EL6/Fedora in Master slave configuration. This is also often called as streaming replication. Before you dig into this topic more, I would suggest going through my other post of implementing point in time recovery (PITR) using postgres 9.2. I am assuming that you have at-least two PostgreSQL 9.2 servers for establishing replication between those two database servers. If you don’t have experience installing PostgreSQL 9.2 on CentOS or Redhat please read my other blog post here on how to install PostgreSQL 9.2 server and get it up and running in no time. First we need to work on master database server and we will eventually move on to slave server configuration.

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How to do point in time recovery with PostgreSQL 9.2 : PITR

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This post describes how to do point in time recovery with PostgreSQL 9.2 : PITR. Point in time recovery (PITR) simply means restoring data upto certain point in time. This method uses low level API backups, if you want to implement PITR using pg_basebackup utility then read my other post here. Before you proceed any further I would assume that you already have a server ready to implement PITR. If you do not have a PostgreSQL database server then I would suggest to read my other post about installing and configuring PostgreSQL 9.2 database server. Now we have a database server running, before we jump into implementation I want you to see your postgres data directory structure, which should look like the following:

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Setup replication with MySQL 5.6 Server on CentOS 6/Redhat EL6/Fedora

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To start off since you are reading this post, I am assuming that you have at-least two MySQL 5.6 servers for establishing replication between those two MySQL 5.6 servers. If you don’t have experience installing MySQL 5.6 on CentOS or Redhat please read my other blog post here on how to install MySQL 5.6 server and get it up and running in no time. No matter how you want to leverage replication in your environment, here are some of the ways you can implement/use replication:

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